The Cycle of the Year as a Breathing Process

When:
June 20, 2016 @ 8:30 pm – 10:30 pm
2016-06-20T20:30:00-04:00
2016-06-20T22:30:00-04:00
Where:
Headlands Dark Sky Viewing Area

sunsetheadlands2014June 20, 2016 @ 8:30 pm – 10:30 pm

WHERE: Headlands Dark Sky Viewing Area

Just like the human being that breathes in a regular rhythm throughout every moment of every day, so, too, does the Earth follow a regular and predictable rhythm through its annual cycle of seasons. The longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere, referred to as “Summer Solstice” arrives June 20th, the same day that Sun and Moon will balance the visible horizon with Full Moon rising in the east as the first Summer Sun sets in the west.

“Full Moon at Summer Solstice only happens once every 19 years, and it means there will be no real darkness to speak of for an entire 24-hour period,” said Mary Stewart Adams, Emmet County’s Program Director for the Headlands International Dark Sky Park. “This provides a really unique opportunity to consider the harmonious rhythm of the natural world, and how, despite our most sophisticated technological advances, we are healthiest when we live in harmony with these larger rhythms.

“If we consider the cycle of the Earth’s year like the in-breathing and the out-breathing of the human being, then Summer Solstice is like the out-breath, so I am very excited that we will have the opportunity to also work with local yoga instructor Mary Reilly at this event, to bring beautiful emphasis and awareness to our own breathing.”  

In addition to leading participants in a basic yoga breathing experience, Mary Reilly will share the story of the “Song of the Immortal Gander”, a beautiful and timeless story of the double nature of the gander as it relates to being human and to the breath.

“As many of our local community members know, Mary is a certified Iyengar Yoga teacher and director of North Woods Yoga in Petoskey (www.northwoodsyoga.com). She has studied extensively in India and has been teaching yoga in Northern Michigan for thirty years. The expertise as well as the tale she is bringing about the “Immortal Gander” are a perfect fit for this time of year, and for what we can see rising up in the night sky at this time, so this will be a really rich experience,” said Adams.

The Headlands Summer Solstice program will take place at the shoreline viewing area from 8:30 to 10:30 pm, and to make ready, here is a list of what’s happening celestially that day:

  • The Sun will rise at 5:49 am on June 20
  • Half an hour later, the Moon will set in the west at 6:17 am, just 45 minutes shy of being at total Full Phase
  • The Moon will be Full at 7:02 am (because this Moon arrives at Full Phase before Sun achieves its solstice moment, this is the last Full Moon of the Spring)
  • Sun then arrives at its Solstice moment, when it is highest above the celestial equator, at 6:34 pm
  • Sun will set in the west at 9:32 pm, while the Moon rises in the east at the exact moment

“This year’s Solstice marks a moment of celestial superlatives that lends itself to taking a deep, cosmic breath, so we’ll take advantage of the night to learn our way around the sky, and to consider the dynamic, rhythmic motion of things,” said Adams.

Parking at Headlands while we are under construction is at the entrance. Guests then take a 15 minute (about one mile) walk through the woods along a paved and gravel route to the shoreline viewing area for the program. Bring camp chairs and blankets, and prepare for weather that is 10 degrees cooler than inland. Programs are interactive and always include guidance about what’s overhead, with telescope on site for enhanced viewing

 

This entry was posted on December 14th, 2015 .